Time To Pull The Plug

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The Second Herschel 400 Roundup

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Last year I started working on observing the Herschel 400 (and cataloged my results for 2012 back in October). While for a variety of reasons 2013 wasn’t the best year for amateur astronomy for me, I was still able to get some observing time in and added some more objects to my Herschel 400 tally. How did I do in 2013?

  • NGC 752
  • NGC 1245
  • NGC 2548 (Messier 48)
  • NGC 3007
  • NGC 3034 (Messier 82)
  • NGC 3607
  • NGC 3608
  • NGC 4216
  • NGC 4251
  • NGC 4261
  • NGC 4273
  • NGC 4274
  • NGC 4281
  • NGC 4303 (Messier 61)
  • NGC 4631
  • NGC 4656
  • NGC 5273
  • NGC 5557
  • NGC 5866
  • NGC 5907
  • NGC 6207
  • NGC 6229
  • NGC 6633
  • NGC 6755
  • NGC 6781
  • NGC 6826
  • NGC 6882
  • NGC 6885
  • NGC 6934
  • NGC 7000
  • NGC 7006
  • NGC 7008
  • NGC 7009
  • NGC 7062
  • NGC 7160
  • NGC 7217
  • NGC 7296
  • NGC 7331
  • NGC 7790

After removing some duplicates, I have 39 new Herschel 400 objects observed in 2013. Combined with the 38 before, I currently have 77 in total, for 19.25% of the entire list. As mentioned previously, many of the Herschel 400 objects are quite difficult in the city and I didn’t get many opportunities in 2013 to travel to dark sites. At home, while I was able to snag a few galaxies from the list, a lot of my time was spent looking for planetary nebulae (which are pretty cool) and open clusters (which are probably my least favorite astronomical object). Here’s hoping 2014 ends up being more productive.

Also, if you have SkySafari, there’s a SkySafari observing list for the Herschel 400 if you’d like to go through the list as well. This saves you the effort of looking through a list in a book or on Wikipedia yourself or creating the list from scratch yourself.

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