Time To Pull The Plug

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Herschel 400 Roundup

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A while back, I started working through the Herschel 400 catalog, because I only had seven Messier objects left to observe and none of them were currently in the night sky. That was back in August. How have I been doing since then?

  • NGC 40
  • NGC 129
  • NGC 136
  • NGC 185
  • NGC 205 (Messier 110)
  • NGC 225
  • NGC 278
  • NGC 381
  • NGC 404
  • NGC 436
  • NGC 457
  • NGC 488
  • NGC 598 (Messier 33)
  • NGC 637
  • NGC 654
  • NGC 659
  • NGC 663
  • NGC 869
  • NGC 884
  • NGC 891
  • NGC 1023
  • NGC 1027
  • NGC 1501
  • NGC 1502
  • NGC 5195 (Messier 51b)
  • NGC 6823
  • NGC 6830
  • NGC 6834
  • NGC 6866
  • NGC 6905
  • NGC 6910
  • NGC 6939
  • NGC 6940
  • NGC 6946
  • NGC 7479
  • NGC 7606
  • NGC 7686
  • NGC 7789

This is currently a total of 38 objects, which isn’t too bad for about a month and a half. Not quite 10% of the objects observed so far.

NB: There are other Herschel 400 objects I have previously observed, but am not counting until I observe them again.

Unsurprisingly, this is a significantly more difficult list of objects to observe than the Messier catalog. At home, I’ve found many of the objects are just plain unobservable, and will have to be observed at dark sites. I’ve been able to observe most of the open clusters and planetary nebulae at home that I’ve tried to see so far, but few of the galaxies so far. Even the non-galactic objects are usually pretty challenging.

There’s also SkySafari observing list for the Herschel 400 if you have SkySafari and would also like to observe the Herschel 400.

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